Call for Applications: 2020 Library of Congress Literacy Awards

We thank our colleague Dawn Stitzel, National Program Director, Library of Congress Literacy Awards Program, for contributing this post.

Teachers – Is your school or organization a nonprofit?  Are you running a program having an impact on literacy? If so, then we at the Library of Congress Literacy Awards want your application!

Why Apply? You could receive cash awards and public recognition for your work and have a chance to network with other award recipients.

A recent example of a school receiving one of the prizes is New York City’s East Side Community High School, the 2018 American Prize recipient.

About the Awards

Through the generosity of philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, the Library of Congress Literacy Awards Program honors nonprofit organizations that have made outstanding contributions to increasing literacy in the United States or abroad. The awards also encourage the continuing development of innovative methods for promoting literacy and the wide dissemination of the most effective practices. They are intended to draw public attention to the importance of literacy, and the need to promote literacy and encourage reading.

Since 2013, the Library of Congress Literacy Awards Program has awarded $1.9 million in prizes to 120 institutions in 35 countries. By recognizing current achievements, the awards seek to enable any organization or program that does not operate on a for-profit basis to strengthen its involvement in literacy and reading promotion and to encourage collaboration with like-minded organizations.

Award Amounts

  • The David M. Rubenstein Prize ($150,000) is awarded for an outstanding and measurable contribution to increasing literacy levels to an organization based either inside or outside the United States that has demonstrated exceptional and sustained depth in its commitment to the advancement of literacy. The organization will meet the highest standards of excellence in its operations and services.
  • The American Prize ($50,000) is awarded for a significant and measurable contribution to increasing literacy levels in the United States or the national awareness of the importance of literacy to an organization that is based in the United States.
  • The International Prize ($50,000) is awarded for a significant and measurable contribution to increasing literacy levels in a country other than the United States to an organization that is based either inside or outside the United States.
  • Best Practice Honorees ($5,000) Each year, up to 15 organizations that apply in the three major prize categories are recognized for their successful implementation of a specific literacy promotion practice.

How to Apply

Visit www.read.gov/literacyawards for the application, rules, and other information.

Deadline

Applications will be accepted until March 6, 2020

Meet the 2019 Award Winners

“Receiving the 2019 David M. Rubenstein Prize provides us with an amazing and unique opportunity to garner more support, raise awareness about adult literacy, and scale our impact to reach more learners.”
ProLiteracy Worldwide, 2019 David M. Rubenstein Prize winner

 

 

 

 

“This award puts a powerful spotlight on the quiet yet critical leadership we have provided since 1919 as we continue to share the joy of reading… and other critical tools and services to blind children and adults across the United States.”
American Action Fund for Blind Children and Adults, 2019 American Prize winner

 

 

“The value of this award is so much more than the incredible $50,000, as it will enable us to raise more funds, maintain our commitment to high quality, and expand our impact.”
ConTextos, 2019 International Prize winner

 

 

 

Created and supported by philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, the Literacy Awards Program is designed to broaden and stimulate public understanding of the essential role of literacy in all aspects of society.

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