Free Webinar May 6: Introduction to the Question Formulation Technique for Primary Source Learning

Students working with the Question Formulation Technique

How can we build the capacity for all students to engage in inquiry and primary source learning through questions? Join us on May 6 at 2pm EDT for a free, one-hour interactive webinar to introduce educators to the Question Formulation Technique (QFT), a strategy through which individuals develop their ability to ask, work with, and use their own questions.

Participants will learn through doing. This is an introductory session, primarily designed for educators and learners who are new to the QFT. The session will be facilitated by RQI’s Director of Professional Learning, Sarah Westbrook, and RQI’s Director of Strategy, Andrew P. Minigan, Co-Directors on a Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources grant. Participants will leave ready to immediately use a powerful, simple strategy to facilitate student inquiry on primary sources.

The event is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

Please request ADA accommodations at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or [email protected].

6 Comments

  1. Eileen Malinowski
    May 1, 2020 at 1:39 pm

    Can’t wait!

  2. Victoria Marcone
    May 1, 2020 at 2:11 pm

    Will this be available to watch after the program is aired? I have to teach from 2-3 and will not be able to participate, but would like to know more about this.

  3. Anastasia Samsky
    May 1, 2020 at 5:24 pm

    I am always interested in learning how to engage students with deeper questioning techniques.

  4. Danna Bell
    May 3, 2020 at 4:45 pm

    We should be recording this webinar and it should be available afterwards.

  5. Dennis Lopez
    May 3, 2020 at 9:09 pm

    I am interested in accessing Library of Congress legislative records, data and research on undocumented immigrant access to public higher education.

  6. Danna Bell
    May 4, 2020 at 8:58 am

    Start your search using Congress.gov. Use the Advance Search to help you get started. Also search the reports of the Congressional Research Service to see if they have done any research on this topic. If you need additional support you can contact the Law Library of Congress through the Ask a Librarian service and they should be able to help direct you to resources that will help answer your questions.

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