National Book Festival Webinar for Educators – September 9 at 7pm

This post is by Kathy McGuigan of the Library of Congress.

This year the Library of Congress National Book Festival will be virtual. Focusing on the theme of “American Ingenuity” this year’s special event will connect audiences with an interactive, online celebration as part of the celebration of the festival’s 20th year.

The National Book Festival will take place September 25-27, and will feature new books by more than 120 of the nation’s most-renowned writers, poets and artists. The festival will also showcase the many ways our national library embraces all subjects in its unparalleled collection. Virtual stages will offer on-demand videos, live author chats and discussions, and options to personalize your own journey through the festival with particular themes. Educators and students will have the opportunity to engage with authors like never before.

And we want to give educators a head start on preparing to participate in this year’s festival.

On September 9 at 7pm ET we will host an educator webinar that will give you a sneak peek into the National Book Festival platform. There will be plenty of time to discuss how you can work the Festival into your instructional plans. All who attend the live, one-hour special educator webinar will be eligible to receive a certificate of participation.

We look forward to talking to you on September 9.

8 Comments

  1. Susan Lane
    September 3, 2020 at 1:02 pm

    Thank you for this upcoming virtual experience that I am sure to be enlightening and rewarding.

  2. Eva Martina Sitorus
    September 4, 2020 at 12:31 am

    good luck

  3. Megan Lederman
    September 4, 2020 at 10:10 am

    As a teacher, I’m so excited for the line up this year!

  4. Patricia Beckner
    September 4, 2020 at 5:58 pm

    Thanks

  5. Angela Williams
    September 4, 2020 at 6:10 pm

    I would love to attend the webinar.

  6. Angela Williams
    September 10, 2020 at 7:10 am

    I missed the webinar. Is there any way I am able to get the information?

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