Ten Years of Teaching with the Library of Congress

Welcome to Teaching with the Library of Congress!

The Library of Congress means many different things to many people. But for teachers and students it represents a source of discovery and learning unlike any other.

Sailors presenting a birthday cake to Admiral Sims

Birthday Cake for Admiral Sims from Washburn Times, January 30, 1919

That’s how our first blog post began on June 1, 2011, and we think the ideas behind it still stand. Ten years later, we can look back on more than a thousand posts, each one an opportunity to share Library of Congress primary sources and teaching ideas that can spark a spirit of discovery among learners. We have welcomed the conversations with educators and students that those posts have provoked.

As Teaching with the Library of Congress begins its second decade, we’re grateful to every reader and to all the authors, interview subjects, and commenters who’ve contributed to the discussion. And we look forward to many more opportunities to discover together.

2 Comments

  1. Joyce Andrews-McKinney
    June 1, 2021 at 12:59 pm

    I enjoy the “teaching “ videos, webinars and resources very much.

    2020-2021 school year I attempted to correlate my 6th grade students with disabilities with our 6th grade English teacher for the virtual field trips about Greek Mythology and Rosa Parks. But, logistics prevented that endeavor. Next school year maybe.

    On a more successful note I did introduce my last and this year’s students to using LOC.gov as a primary resource tool.

    Keep up the good work! Congratulations on your 10 year milestone.

  2. Mosayyeb Samanian
    June 2, 2021 at 10:35 am

    i am very happy that i have opportunity for participant your blog

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