Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Introducing Trey Smith, 2015-2016 Library of Congress Science Teacher in Residence

I would in no way compare myself to Benjamin Franklin–for a number of very good reasons. However, as a newly minted science Teacher in Residence at the Library of Congress, I recognize that reflecting on Franklin, both as man and myth, might help me make sense of the opportunities ahead.

Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Size, Scale, and Scientific Communication

From atoms to cells, organisms to ecosystems, and Earth’s systems to galaxies, scientists study and make sense of objects and phenomena of all shapes and sizes. Primary sources can serve as starting points for students to explore the ways in which scientists study and communicate about things and events, large and small.

Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Severe Weather and Community Resilience

Throughout human history, communities have contended with the consequences and costs of severe weather. Recent discourse about climate, sea levels, and weather events include both national and local-level conversations about building community resilience in response to severe weather. Primary sources can initiate deep learning about severe weather and community preparedness and responses.

Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Coal River and Human Impacts on Earth’s Systems

Individually and collectively humans exert both positive and negative influences on Earth’s systems. Teachers and students studying the interactions among Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere and related human activity can explore images, manuscripts, and recorded oral history interviews from the Coal River community in West Virginia.