And to Think That I Saw It in Union Square: Primary Sources Representing Public Space

Union Square opened as a public park in 1839, and by the first decades of the twentieth century was an established destination for anyone who wanted to stroll under the trees, shop for flowers, or just sit and read a newspaper. But it was also the site of a variety of large and small public demonstrations and events.

Women in Baseball: A Junior Fellow Meets the Bloomer Girls

As mentioned in my previous blog post, I am one of 40 Junior Fellows at the Library of Congress this summer, and I have been working on researching women in baseball and updating the Library’s primary source set for educators on baseball.

New Online Collection: The Woodrow Wilson Papers

We’re delighted to announce that the Woodrow Wilson Papers are now online. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Wilson documents in the world, and provide teachers and students with many opportunities for discovery.

Mark Twain: Exploring His Life and Work with Primary Sources

Mark Twain’s reputation spans the centuries: He spent much of his lifetime as one of the most famous writers in the United States, and his works continue to appear in classrooms, as well as in debates over the curriculum. Even now, more than a century after his death, the discovery of an unpublished Twain tale has led to the publication of a new children’s book, which is the subject of an upcoming program at the Library of Congress.

Was Hammurabi Pro-Temperance? The Importance of Critical Reading and Historical Context

According to an article in the August 28, 1912, edition of The Presbyterian of the South, “The attempts at regulation [of alcohol] failed and the civilization of Babylon was snuffed out in an orgy of drink.” An article like this presents an opportunity to teach students how to read content critically and to place it in historical context.