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Category: Development of the Industrial United States (1877-1914)

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New Online Collection: The Woodrow Wilson Papers

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

We're delighted to announce that the Woodrow Wilson Papers are now online. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Wilson documents in the world, and provide teachers and students with many opportunities for discovery.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Mark Twain: Exploring His Life and Work with Primary Sources

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

Mark Twain's reputation spans the centuries: He spent much of his lifetime as one of the most famous writers in the United States, and his works continue to appear in classrooms, as well as in debates over the curriculum. Even now, more than a century after his death, the discovery of an unpublished Twain tale has led to the publication of a new children’s book, which is the subject of an upcoming program at the Library of Congress.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Was Hammurabi Pro-Temperance? The Importance of Critical Reading and Historical Context

Posted by: Danna Bell

According to an article in the August 28, 1912, edition of The Presbyterian of the South, “The attempts at regulation [of alcohol] failed and the civilization of Babylon was snuffed out in an orgy of drink.” An article like this presents an opportunity to teach students how to read content critically and to place it in historical context.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

An Ode to Autumn by a Writer in the Spring of Her Career

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

Helen Keller had been eagerly writing since she had first gained the ability to do so several years before. Although an illness in her infancy had left her unable to see or hear, an inventive teacher, Annie Sullivan, introduced her to language, and soon she was reading and writing using braille and the assistance of interpreters.