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Category: Development of the Industrial United States (1877-1914)

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Helping Students Read Between the Lines: Identifying Bias and Attitude in Newspapers for the Presidential Election of 1912

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

In the November/December 2015 issue of Social Education, the journal of the National Council for the Social Studies, our “Sources and Strategies” article focused on analyzing newspapers from the presidential election of 1912, an unusual contest at an unusual time.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Multimedia Moment: Analyzing Film in the Classroom

Posted by: Danna Bell

Viewing a film in class is a commitment of time and technology. Teachers want students to be active viewers, but most are more familiar with passively viewing film and video. How can teachers present film in a way that students are more likely to analyze its content? What aspects of viewing film may be beneficial to consider before analysis?

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Paint, Poisoning, Proportions, and Public Health and Policy

Posted by: Danna Bell

Throughout history, humans have sought out substances to color, coat, and cover dwellings, objects, and bodies. Modern inorganic pigments and dyes joined natural and organic substances used by the ancients. The properties of one substance, lead white, once made it the pigment of choice in white paint. However, the toxicity of lead contributed to a public health crisis.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Edgar Allan Poe: Using Primary Sources from the Library of Congress to Deepen Understanding of “The Raven”

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

Because of his tendency toward the macabre, the stories of Edgar Allan Poe are frequently associated with Halloween, but his writing has had a far deeper reach than connections to the holiday. As National Poetry Month approaches, students can explore his work and its cultural impact through primary sources from the Library of Congress.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Tragedy and Transformation: Looking at San Francisco’s Chinatown with Primary Sources

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

Much of the city, including its Chinese immigration enclave, Chinatown, was destroyed by tremors and fires. While this was a devastating tragedy, it was also an opportunity to rebuild and renew. Below is a series of photographs from the Library's Prints and Photographs collections that offers a path for student engagement with San Francisco's pre- and post-earthquake Chinatown.