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Category: Poetry and Literature

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

An Ode to Autumn by a Writer in the Spring of Her Career

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

Helen Keller had been eagerly writing since she had first gained the ability to do so several years before. Although an illness in her infancy had left her unable to see or hear, an inventive teacher, Annie Sullivan, introduced her to language, and soon she was reading and writing using braille and the assistance of interpreters.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Five Questions with Shelley NiTuama, on detail to Educational Outreach from the National Endowment for the Humanities

Posted by: Danna Bell

I'm delighted to be back at the Library in a new incarnation as a librarian-educator. I'm excited to be able to bring all that professional experience to bear in my current charge, which is to engage audiences in creating and sharing knowledge, inspire a love of reading and research, and inform the public about the treasures here.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Banned Books Week: News Coverage of Textbook Burnings During World War I

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

During the last week of September, a number of organizations observe Banned Books Week, an annual celebration of the freedom to read. As the Library of Congress is currently commemorating the hundredth anniversary of U.S. involvement in World War I, this is an opportunity to explore a wave of book burnings in American towns that took place during the war.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Reconstructing a Civil War Battle from a Poet’s Letter Home

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

In the May/June 2017 issue of Social Education, the journal of the National Council for the Social Studies, our “Sources and Strategies” article features a letter that Walt Whitman wrote to his mother on December 29, 1862. Whitman wrote the letter to let his mother know that he had found his brother George alive and healing from an injury sustained during the Battle of Fredericksburg.