Mark Twain: Exploring His Life and Work with Primary Sources

Mark Twain’s reputation spans the centuries: He spent much of his lifetime as one of the most famous writers in the United States, and his works continue to appear in classrooms, as well as in debates over the curriculum. Even now, more than a century after his death, the discovery of an unpublished Twain tale has led to the publication of a new children’s book, which is the subject of an upcoming program at the Library of Congress.

Encouraging Citizens to “Wake Up and Read” – Celebrating National Library Week and School Library Month with Primary Sources

As I read the information provided on the history of National Library Week and School Library Month I began to think about the various posters in the Library of Congress online collections that encouraged people to visit libraries or to read.

An Ode to Autumn by a Writer in the Spring of Her Career

Helen Keller had been eagerly writing since she had first gained the ability to do so several years before. Although an illness in her infancy had left her unable to see or hear, an inventive teacher, Annie Sullivan, introduced her to language, and soon she was reading and writing using braille and the assistance of interpreters.

Five Questions with Shelley NiTuama, on detail to Educational Outreach from the National Endowment for the Humanities

I’m delighted to be back at the Library in a new incarnation as a librarian-educator. I’m excited to be able to bring all that professional experience to bear in my current charge, which is to engage audiences in creating and sharing knowledge, inspire a love of reading and research, and inform the public about the treasures here.