Helping Students Explore Their Community’s Past through Photography

Driven by a sense of urgency in documenting aspects of American life that are disappearing, such as barns, lighthouses, motor courts, and eclectic roadside art, photographer Carol Highsmith has donated her work to the Library of Congress since 1992. The images, recording current scenes and historical remnants of rural, urban, and small town life, are worthy of study. The project might also inspire students to document and preserve that which makes their own communities unique.

New World War I Teacher Resources from the Library of Congress

Teachers can help their students explore these moments and many more using the Library’s newest primary source set, World War I. This set brings together primary sources that document a war that was like no other, and that brought about tremendous political, social, and technological changes.

Education Highlights from the 2016 National Book Festival

One highlight of the National Book Festival is the opportunity to talk with so many teachers about the Library’s program for K-12 educators. On Saturday we were able to meet more than 120 teachers and school librarians and tell them about the Library’s amazing online collections of primary sources, and about the teacher resources available at loc.gov/teachers. Learning from teachers is an important part of our program, and we’re grateful that the National Book Festival provides a venue for us to exchange ideas with educators from around the country.