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One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Helping Students Visualize the Process of Change with Historic Images

Posted by: Stephen Wesson

The article highlights a number of images from the early 20th century that the National Child Labor Committee used in their campaign to abolish child labor, including photographs by Lewis Hine. Although today these dramatic photos are often viewed as art objects, the NCLC used them as tools--as persuasive elements that would help them make their case against child labor in the public sphere and in the halls of Congress.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Dedicated to the Great Task: Remembering and Studying Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

On November 19, 1863, renowned orator Edward Everett spoke at the dedication of a memorial cemetery. The world has little noted nor long remembered what he said in those two hours. Everett’s oration was upstaged by the next speaker’s concise 272 words, now familiar as Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. The following day, Everett himself sent Lincoln a note, complimenting him, “I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes.”

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Blog Round-Up: Informational Text for Meeting Your Standards

Posted by: Danna Bell

Like many readers of the Teaching with the Library of Congress blog, we have identified strategies related to the Common Core’s instructional “shift” toward integrating more informational texts into literacy programs. Today’s summer blog round-up pulls together five posts packed with ideas for using informational texts from the Library’s collections.

Image from newspaper article on women soldiers with drawing of women wearing military cap

Women Soldiers in the Civil War, Part 1: Going Behind the Gender Lines

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

Women filled a variety of roles in the Civil War. In addition to women who served as spies, daughters of regiments, cooks, laundresses, and nurses, approximately 400 posed as male soldiers. So, who were these hundreds of women soldiers? Why did they join? And how did they manage to do it?