Top of page

Search results for: Trey

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Primary Sources in Science Classrooms: Plants, Photos from Tuskegee, and Planning Investigations

Posted by: Cheryl Lederle

Scientific investigations with plants are a staple in elementary school classrooms. Young learners study plant structures and functions, what plants need to grow, how plants reproduce and pass on genetic information, and how matter and energy move in ecosystems. As they learn core scientific ideas, students should simultaneously engage in the practices of scientists. Historic photographs can serve as windows into planning and carrying out scientific investigations.

One woman watches as another examines with a magnifying glass an ornate, decorative image on a printed page

Primary Sources in the Science (and Math) Classroom: Thomas Jefferson’s Measurement Problem

Posted by: Danna Bell

Jefferson's search for a tool to measure distances he traveled in a horse-drawn carriage was just one of his many efforts to quantify and logically describe the natural world. He also wrote a report on weights and measures, kept copious weather records, and created a chart detailing the fruits and vegetables sold at a vegetable market throughout the year. A closer look at Jefferson’s notes about odometers presents a range of possibilities for engaging students in mathematical reasoning and problem solving.