Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Network Analysis (part 6 of 7)

This is part six in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow, is is a short but useful introduction to doing network analysis with data based on collections. Part one is available here, and the full guide is available as a PDF download

Network analysis looks at relationships within a dataset. In the humanities, network analysis can look at kinship ties, social media connections, or conversations between characters in a novel. In network analysis, one looks at vertices (called ‘nodes’) connected by lines (called ‘edges’).

Examples Kindred Britain networks nearly 30,000 important figures from British culture connected by kinship, marriage, etc. Users can select two individuals and see how they are related and through who and across how much time.

Screenshot from Kindred Britain that shows the people connecting Napoleon Bonaparte to Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll)

Screenshot from Kindred Britain that shows the people connecting Napoleon Bonaparte to Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll)

Martin Grandjean’s network visualizations of Shakespeare’s tragedies represents each character as a node connected to each other by an edge if they appear in a scene together.

Networkdiagram

Network diagram showing the characters in Hamlet who have scenes together.

Gephi is the tool most often used for network analysis projects. It’s free, open-source, and well documented. An introduction/tutorial to Gephi by Martin Grandjean can be found here.

This blog post by Elijah Meeks introduces network analysis and representation.

Scott Weingart’s article Demystifying Networks, Parts I & II in the Journal of Digital Humanities covers some of the conceptual issues of network analysis.

For more by Elijah Meeks and Scott Weingart, here is a round-up of their posts on network analysis.

NETWORK ANALYSIS TOOLS

Gephi – Free, open-source graph visualization tool.

Here is an introduction to Gephi from Martin Grandjean, creator of the above Shakespeare tragedy visualizations.

Palladio – Free, web-based tool from Stanford. Copy and paste spreadsheet or upload tabular data to quickly make network graphs and geospatial maps.

New Audio Digitization Performance Testing Guidelines and Software from FADGI

The following is a guest post by Kate Murray, organizer of the FADGI Audio-Visual Working Group and Digital Projects Coordinator at the Library of Congress. The Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative is pleased to announce the release of ADCTest, an open source software application designed to facilitate performance testing of analog-to-digital converters (ADC) used in […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7)

This is part five in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, part two about making digital documents is here, part three is about tools to work with data, part four is all about doing text analysis, and today’s post is focused on spatial analysis. The full […]

Iterative Collaboration at LC Labs

The following is a repost of a blog post from the SAA’s Electronic Records Section: BloggERS! This post is part of the recent BloggERS series on “Collaborating Beyond the Archival Profession.”  The LC Labs team works to increase the impact of Library of Congress digital collections. This includes not only the 2,500,000+ items available on loc.gov, […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Text analysis (part 4 of 7)

This is part four in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, part two about making digital documents is here, part three is about tools to work with data, and part four (below) is all about doing text analysis. The full guide is available […]

Making a Newspaperbot

The following is a guest post from Library of Congress Labs Innovation Intern, Aditya Jain. While exploring the possibilities of digital collections, Aditya created @newspaperbot. Below he shares his process, some of the challenges he encountered, along with the code. The Chronicling America API provides access to historical newspapers from the first half of the […]

January Innovator-in-Residence Update: Experiments with Jer Thorp

We’ve been delighted to have Library of Congress Innovator-in-Residence Jer Thorp with us since October. During the first three months of his residency he has connected with staff, visited collections, and explored forms of data to make better sense the inner workings of the Library. Jer has been weaving together those threads with experiments and […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: So now you have digital data… (part 3 of 7)

This is part three of our Digital Scholarship Research Guide created by Samantha Herron. See parts one about digital scholarship projects and two about how to create digital documents. So now you have digital data… Great! But what to do? Regardless of what your data are (sometimes it’s just pictures and documents and notes, sometimes […]

From Code to Colors: Working with the loc.gov JSON API

The following is a guest post by Laura Wrubel, software development librarian with George Washington University Libraries, who has joined the Library of Congress Labs team during her research leave. The Library of Congress website has an API ( “application programming interface”) which delivers the content for each web page. What’s kind of exciting is […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7

This is part two in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, and the full guide is available as a PDF download.  Creating Digital Documents The first step in creating an electronic copy of an analog (non-digital) document is usually scanning it […]