Digital Preservation News, August 1-5, 2011

The following is a guest post by Lara Lookabaugh, an intern working with the Digital Preservation Outreach and Education Initiative.

Five Tips for Designing Preservable Websites – http://blog.photography.si.edu/2011/08/02/five-tips-for-designing-preservable-websites/

The Smithsonian Institution Archives outline five tips for designing websites for digital preservation, including following accessibility guidelines and maintaining stable URLs.

Flash more reliable than hard disk? – http://blog.dshr.org/2011/07/flash-more-reliable-than-hard-disk.html

David Rosenthal briefly recaps an article showing that despite vendor claims, flash-based SSDs actually fail at rates comparable with hard drives.

Upcoming: 9/11 TV News Archive Conference from Internet Archive and New York University – http://blog.archive.org/2011/08/03/upcoming-911-tv-news-archive-conference-from-internet-archive-and-new-york-university/

What kinds of research and scholarship will be enabled by access to an online database of TV news broadcasts? This conference, co-presented by Internet Archive and NYU’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation Program, will offer contemporary insights and predictions on new directions in television news studies.

Best Practices Exchange 2011 Call for Proposals, due September 15http://www.bpexchange.org/2011/?page_id=16

The BPE is a conference that focuses on the management of digital information in state government, and it brings together practitioners to discuss their real-world experiences, including best practices and lessons learned.

Glimpse into the Future of Repositories: videos now available – http://infteam.jiscinvolve.org/wp/2011/08/04/glimpse-into-the-future-of-repositories-videos-now-available/

Videos and final results from the Developer Challenge for Open Repositories 2011–the Future of Repositories.

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