Calling all readers of the Signal!

If you’re reading this, you’re likely to know that the Signal is a collaborative blog that was created to share about digital preservation efforts and has since traced the evolution of digital practices over the years. We regularly share about ongoing projects and work undertaken by Digital Collection Management specialists as well as by the LC Labs team.

In June’s LC Labs newsletter, we shared a survey written to collect feedback about your experience as a reader of the Signal blog. We’re still looking for more responses and want to hear from YOU!

Whether you’re a long-time reader or you’ve just recently subscribed for updates, we’re grateful for your readership! If you’d like to tell us what you think of the blog, and what you’d like to see more of, please respond to the following survey. It should only take about 5-10 minutes of your time and aims to get a better sense of how our posts are resonating with readers.

We hope to hear from you and encourage you to share with any other regular readers of the Signal!

woman reading while seated on couch

Rubinstein [seated on couch, reading] (LOC)

3 Comments

  1. Melanie Lee
    July 13, 2020 at 12:09 pm

    It’s a worthwhile endeavor and since I am new to it, I look forward to using it!

  2. Candan Alayguevenci
    July 13, 2020 at 12:20 pm

    Sorry but what are you talking about!!!

    “Signal” is not a “Blog”!!!

    Signal is a cross-platform encrypted messaging service developed by the Signal Foundation and Signal Messenger LLC. It uses the Internet to send one-to-one and group messages, which can include files, voice notes, images and videos. Its mobile apps can also make one-to-one voice and video calls, and the Android version can optionally function as an SMS app.

  3. Millard Schisler
    July 16, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    I enjoy every single post that I get. I also share them to students, other friends and co-workers and use them a lot as references to my own work. Thanks for keeping up this work – is is fundamental for the field.

Add a Comment

This blog is governed by the general rules of respectful civil discourse. You are fully responsible for everything that you post. The content of all comments is released into the public domain unless clearly stated otherwise. The Library of Congress does not control the content posted. Nevertheless, the Library of Congress may monitor any user-generated content as it chooses and reserves the right to remove content for any reason whatever, without consent. Gratuitous links to sites are viewed as spam and may result in removed comments. We further reserve the right, in our sole discretion, to remove a user's privilege to post content on the Library site. Read our Comment and Posting Policy.

Required fields are indicated with an * asterisk.