Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: People, Blogs and Labs (part 7 of 7)

"I Love Data" She Wept, by bixentro, on Flickr

“I Love Data” She Wept, by
bixentro, on Flickr

This is the final post in a seven-part series by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. She created this guide to help LC Labs explore how to support digital scholarship at the Library and we started publishing them in January. She’s covered why digital materials matter, how to create digital documents, what digital documents make possibletext analysis tools, spatial humanities/GIS/mapping & timelines, and network analysis tools. Herron rounds out all of this useful information with lists of digital scholarship people, labs and blogs to follow to learn even more. The full guide is also available as a PDF download. 

We hope you’ve gained some introductory understanding of what digital scholarship is and how to go about planing a digital project. Please feel free to add your own favorite resources to this list in the comments of this post. And a big “thank-you” to Sam for creating this guide during her fellowship. Look for this content to be developed in a a workshop in the next year, so we would really value your input on more resources and guides to consider. LC Labs is interested in helping scholars and users of all backgrounds to use the Library’s collections in digital projects. Also check-out the LC for Robots page where we’ve created a one-stop-shop for the Library’s computational resources and get started using the tools and techniques you’ve learned about in this blog series.

 

#DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP PEOPLE + BLOGS

Miriam Posner, UCLA

Bethany Nowviskie, UVA + DLF at CLIR

Ted Underwood, University of Illinois

Dan Cohen, Northeastern

Ben Schmidt, Northeastern

Sapping Attention

Matthew Jockers, University of Nebraska

Matthew Kirschenbaum, University of Maryland

Mark Sample, Davidson College

And more…This is the list of feeds subscribed to by DHNow. This is the list of blogs from the CUNY Digital Humanities Research Guide.

 

#DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP LABS

Explore these websites for more examples of completed and in-progress digital scholarship projects. This is not an exhaustive list but meant as a starting point. 

 Digital Scholarship Lab, University of Richmond

Digital Scholarship Lab, Brown University

CESTA (Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis), Stanford University

Spatial History group, CESTA, Stanford University

Literary Lab, Stanford University

Text Technologies, Stanford University

Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Stanford University

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University – Creators of THATCamp and DHNow blog + software Omeka and Zotero.

Scholars’ Lab, University of Virginia

Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, University of Virginia

Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland

MIT Hyperstudio, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Matrix, Michigan State University

 

DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP SYLLABI

The CUNY Digital Humanities Resource Guide has compiled many available digital scholarship syllabi and related tools here.

Miriam Posner’s Fall 2015 Introduction to Digital Humanities syllabus is online here, and she has also collected other intro syllabi here.

Miriam Posner has also made a Digital Humanities and the Library bibliography.

Digital Art History 101 – Johanna Drucker, Steven Nelson, Todd Presner, Miriam Posner

 

SOME DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP BOOKS

Available online:

Burdick, Anne, and Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld, Todd Presner, Jeffrey Schnapp. Digital_Humanities. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012. Available online: https://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/titles/content/9780262018470_Open_Access_Edition.pdf

Gold, Matthew K, ed. Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. Available online: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/

Gold, Matthew K, ed. Debates in the Digital Humanities 2012. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. Available online: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/

Schreibman, S. Siemens, R., Unsworth, J., eds. A Companion to Digital Humanities. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture, 2007. Available online: http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/

Schreibman, S., Siemens, R., eds. A Companion to Digital Literary Studies. Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture, 2008. Available online:  http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companionDLS/

 

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7)

This is part five in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, part two about making digital documents is here, part three is about tools to work with data, part four is all about doing text analysis, and today’s post is focused on spatial analysis. The full […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Text analysis (part 4 of 7)

This is part four in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, part two about making digital documents is here, part three is about tools to work with data, and part four (below) is all about doing text analysis. The full guide is available […]

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Making Digital Resources, Part 2 of 7

This is part two in a seven part resource guide for digital scholarship by Samantha Herron, our 2017 Junior Fellow. Part one is available here, and the full guide is available as a PDF download.  Creating Digital Documents The first step in creating an electronic copy of an analog (non-digital) document is usually scanning it […]

Introducing Beyond Words

As a part of Library of Congress Labs release last week, the National Digital Initiatives team launched Beyond Words. This pilot crowdsourcing application was created in collaboration with the Serial and Government Publications Division and the Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) at the Library of Congress. In our first week and a half, […]

Hack-to-Learn at the Library of Congress

When hosting workshops, such as Software Carpentry, or events, such as Collections As Data, our National Digital Initiatives team made a discovery—there is an appetite among librarians for hands-on computational experience. That’s why we created an inclusive hackathon, or a “hack-to-learn,” taking advantage of the skills librarians already have and paring them with programmers to […]

Automating Digital Archival Processing at Johns Hopkins University

This is a guest post from Elizabeth England, National Digital Stewardship Resident, and Eric Hanson, Digital Content Metadata Specialist, at Johns Hopkins University.  Elizabeth: In my National Digital Stewardship Residency at Johns Hopkins University’s Sheridan Libraries, I am responsible for a digital preservation project addressing a large backlog (about 50 terabytes) of photographs documenting the university’s […]

Recommendations for Enabling Digital Scholarship

Mass digitization — coupled with new media, technology and distribution networks — has transformed what’s possible for libraries and their users. The Library of Congress makes millions of items freely available on loc.gov and other public sites like HathiTrust and DPLA. Incredible resources — like digitized historic newspapers from across the United States, the personal papers […]

Using Three-Dimensional Modeling to Preserve Cultural Heritage

This is a guest post by Elizabeth England, a resident in the National Digital Stewardship Residency program. In recent years, a few news stories focused on the use of digital tools in preserving cultural heritage three-dimensional objects, stories such as the printed reconstruction of the Arch of Triumph in Palmyra, Syria and the construction of a […]