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Category: Digital Content

Why Experiment: Machine Learning at the Library of Congress  

Posted by: Laurie Allen

Why Machine Learning? Everyone at the Library of Congress wants the materials we steward and the services we offer to be useful for as many people as possible. It’s why we do what we do! And across the Library, staff have long relied on technological innovations to enable people to use our materials to become …

Dozens of squares, each with its own individual color or shade, lined up in rows and columns

Strategic Plan 2.0: A Digitally-Infused Five-Year Plan

Posted by: Leah Weinryb-Grohsgal

For decades, digital technologies have rewritten the playbook for government agencies, libraries, and cultural heritage organizations. The Library of Congress has investigated, implemented, and even invented new digital approaches and technical methods since the 1950s, aspiring better to serve Congress and the American people with each new technical turn. Today, technology fuels everything we do, …

Cartoon illustration of event from above, participant wearing mask, people eating at a table, a person looking at a projection inside tent.

Tigers & Portals: Seeing Lost Enclaves Community Memory Event

Posted by: Jaime Mears

This is a guest blog post by Library of Congress Innovator in Residence Jeffrey Yoo Warren in conversation with Vic Xu, an anti-disciplinary artist whose work explores the potential of storytelling to create room for counter-histories and counter-archives, and Vuthy Lay, who draws from the language of the everyday to create work that flows between …

Dark chinatown street, warmly lit, with vertical Library logo and seeing lost enclaves handwritten

Relational Reconstruction Toolkit Now Available

Posted by: Jaime Mears

This post was co-written with LC writer and editor Sahar Kazmi. Relational Reconstruction Toolkit Now Available For the past year, Innovator in Residence Jeffrey Yoo Warren worked with LC staff, collections and community members to develop an open source “relational reconstruction” toolkit to share his methodology and inspire the public to reconstruct other lost enclaves …

Grace Bicho, Lauren Baker, and Abbie Grotke posing for a photo in an auditorium

Reflections on the 2023 Web Archiving Conference

Posted by: Tracee Haupt

Today’s guest post is from Abbie Grotke (Assistant Head of the Digital Content Management section), Grace Bicho (Senior Digital Collections Specialist), Lauren Baker (Senior Digital Collections Specialist), and Abbey Potter (Senior Innovation Specialist), all from the Library of Congress. In May, the Library of Congress sent four representatives to the 2023 Web Archiving Conference and …

The Web Archiving Team Answers Questions About the Web Archives

Posted by: Tracee Haupt

Have you ever wondered what exactly is web archiving? How the Library select which websites to preserve? Or how you would find and search the web archives? The Web Archiving Team’s Senior Digital Collection Specialists gathered to answer these questions and more in a live webinar during the Preservation Directorate’s celebration of Preservation Week. If …

Construction of the dome of the Jefferson Building

Improvements Ahead for the Web Archives

Posted by: Tracee Haupt

Today’s guest post is from Abbie Grotke, Assistant Head of the Digital Content Management section at the Library of Congress. Users of the Library of Congress Web Archives may have recently noticed issues when trying to access archived content presented at webarchive.loc.gov. We want to give some background and explanation about the ongoing work that is happening to modernize and …

digitized scan of historic map of austria-hungary

Check out: The Secret Life of GeoTIFFs

Posted by: Eileen J. Manchester

n October 2022, the outcomes of a 2015 experiment to geo-reference 4,998 digitized maps of the Austro-Hungarian empire were shared with the public at the Computing Cultural Heritage in the Cloud Data Jam. Check out this recent post on World's Revealed, the Library's Geography and Maps blog, to learn more about the resulting GeoTIFF files enable access to digitized historical maps.