Blogs Category: Native Americans

Arizona Statehood Anniversary

Today, February 14, you might be thinking about getting flowers for your sweetheart, or birds picking their mates, or buying marked-off chocolate tomorrow. You may not have realized that today is the 110th anniversary of Arizona’s statehood. New Mexico and Arizona were admitted to the union in 1912, after a long delay; Arizona was the […]

New Acquisitions for Indigenous People’s Day

Greetings from Nacotchtank, Piscataway and Pamunkey traditional lands. As the last fiscal year just ended, the Law Library’s Collection Services Division staff are looking back on a successful acquisitions year. It seems like a good time to talk about some of our successes, especially acquisitions related to Indigenous peoples, since yesterday was the day that […]

Orange Shirt Day

In Canada today, people are commemorating Orange Shirt Day. This July, the Canadian government passed legislation to create the federal statutory holiday called the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation– also known as Orange Shirt Day, as it was named before the federal holiday was established. Orange Shirt Day is so named because the grandmother […]

View Our New Web Resource: Indigenous Law Web Archive

The Law Library collects and preserves legal materials for American law, foreign law, and sovereign Indigenous nations. Many governments, including Indigenous national, tribal and community governments, are transitioning from print to solely digital formats for publishing their laws. The Law Library is working to collect and preserve these materials. To further these collection and preservation […]

John Ross: His Struggle for Homeland and Sovereignty

This post was co-authored by Jennifer Davis and Shannon Herlihy, Law Library Creative Intern. Saturday, October 3, was the birthday of Principal Chief John Ross (ᎫᏫᏍᎫᏫ) a member of the Cherokee Nation, of Cherokee and Scottish descent, who through his tribal leadership guided the Cherokee people through multiple legal challenges. Ross was educated at mission […]

Navajo Code Talkers Day

Today is National Navajo Code Talkers Day, first celebrated on August 14, 1982, forty years after the Code Talkers project started and 14 years after it was declassified. In 1942, the United States was fighting World War II in the Pacific, and needed an unbreakable code for passing messages about operations, especially battle operations. The […]

The Battle of Greasy Grass

The Battle of Greasy Grass, June 25-26, 1876, also known as The Battle of Little Bighorn and Custer’s Last Stand, marks a great victory for the Oceti Sakowin people. The battle’s roots started with the Report on the Condition of the Indian Tribes (1867); after the report was issued, “the  United States government set out […]

Chief Standing Bear and His Landmark Civil Rights Case

The National Statuary Hall of the United States Capitol has a number of statues of indigenous Americans—Will Rogers, Kamehameha I, Washakie, Po’pay, Sequoyah, Sakakawea, and the newest—Chief Standing Bear, just donated to the hall by Nebraska and installed in September 2019. If a legal scholar wanted to study an inspiring legal figure for Native American […]