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Archive: 2024 (13 Posts)

Clipping of a color image of a tree and persons underneath holding arms.

Famous American Trees

Posted by: Amber Paranick

The following is a guest post by Donnie Summerlin, a Digital Projects Archivist at the University of Georgia Libraries in Athens, GA, and by Kerry Huller, a Digital Conversion Specialist in the Serial and Government Publications Division at the Library of Congress. The University of Georgia is the National Digital Newspaper Program awardee for the state of Georgia.

Dune’s Shai-Hulud and Other Sandworms

Posted by: Malea Walker

Frank Herbert’s Dune Chronicles series is known as the first major world building science fiction saga. Published in 1965, Dune’s influence is clear in many science fiction novels and movies produced since then. Some of the most obvious examples of Dune’s influence can be found in the stories of large, sand-dwelling creatures of nightmares that …

A black, white and grey photo of a classroom. On the right side the teacher sits in front of a chalkboard. On the left of the image the class sits studying globes.

Eclipsed No More: Women Astronomers You Should Know

Posted by: Meg Metcalf

“First, no woman should say, ‘I am but a woman!’ But a woman! What more can you ask to be?” – Maria Mitchell (1818-1889), American Astronomer Meteor showers, comets, eclipses, and other celestial events have captured human interest and imagination for thousands of years. Astronomical phenomena have long been speculated over in the press, and …

Clipping of a newpaper caricature of four individuals jumping over a calendar with visible text leap year.

Leap Day in the Press

Posted by: Amber Paranick

Read about the history and traditions of Leap Day in the pages of Chronicling America, our historic collection of digitized newspapers.

Three mastheads and headlines from the front pages of The Echo, The Daily Bulletin, and the Omaha Guide.

Mary McLeod Bethune: Newspapers and Comic Books

Posted by: Joanna Colclough

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) dedicated her whole life to advocating for civil rights, especially the education of youth. You can find her work making headlines in Chronicling America newspapers, as well as her friendship with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and other high profile people of the day. Even some comic books featured her biography.

How Tragedy Led to Love for John Tyler and Julia Gardiner

Posted by: Heather Thomas

On the afternoon of February 28, 1844, President John Tyler and roughly 400 guests were enjoying a cruise down the Potomac River on the new US Navy warship USS Princeton, when the mammoth, 13-ton naval gun on board, known as the “Peacemaker,” exploded. The disaster came close to costing the president his life, but instead it led to his marriage.