Top of page

Archive: 2024 (7 Posts)

Three mastheads and headlines from the front pages of The Echo, The Daily Bulletin, and the Omaha Guide.

Mary McLeod Bethune: Newspapers and Comic Books

Posted by: Joanna Colclough

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) dedicated her whole life to advocating for civil rights, especially the education of youth. You can find her work making headlines in Chronicling America newspapers, as well as her friendship with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and other high profile people of the day. Even some comic books featured her biography.

How Tragedy Led to Love for John Tyler and Julia Gardiner

Posted by: Heather Thomas

On the afternoon of February 28, 1844, President John Tyler and roughly 400 guests were enjoying a cruise down the Potomac River on the new US Navy warship USS Princeton, when the mammoth, 13-ton naval gun on board, known as the “Peacemaker,” exploded. The disaster came close to costing the president his life, but instead it led to his marriage.

Truman Capote, half-length portrait, facing front, holding hands with Katharine Graham at the masked ball Black and White Ball.Capote wears a tuxedo and holds hands with Katharine Graham, who is wearing a white dress and a masquerade mask.

Capote & The Swans Make Headlines

Posted by: Meg Metcalf

Acclaimed author Truman Capote was born in 1924 in New Orleans. An openly gay man from the deep south, Capote defied social expectations and lived his life authentically despite the risk. Known for his small stature and large personality, he surrounded himself with the most famous, fashionable, and wealthy women in New York, whom he …

Comic books propped up and laid open on display.

A Comics Display for the British Library

Posted by: Joanna Colclough

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the British Library, the Serial and Government Publications Division displayed some related comic book content on Captain Britain, Miracleman, Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, and Winston Churchill.

The Gilded Age: Technology & Invention

Posted by: Heather Thomas

Spanning roughly 1870-1900, the Gilded Age was a time of rapid industrialization in the United States. The country was transforming from an agrarian society of farmers and small producers to an industrial economy based in large urban cities. At the same time, there was a burst of innovation in the fields of engineering, science, and technology, which brought about some of the modern era's most innovative inventions. Here is a look at some of those inventions through historical newspapers.