Women’s Fashion History Through Newspapers: 1900-1920

Women’s fashion has a long and colorful history and, in the 20th century, newspapers captured it all! You can find full newspaper pages with photographs of the latest fashions from Paris, department store advertisements with drawings of the popular frocks of the day, and articles covering social events and what fashionable people in attendance were […]

Tulsa Race Massacre: Newspaper Complicity and Coverage

The following is a guest post by Arlene Balkansky. Arlene recently retired from being a librarian in the Newspaper and Current Periodical Reading Room, and was a regular writer for Headlines and Heroes. One hundred years ago, Greenwood, a prosperous Black neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, described as Black Wall Street, was destroyed by white mobs in […]

Before Brown v. Board of Education, There was Tape v. Hurley

Tape v. Hurley (1885) is one the most important civil rights decisions that you’ve likely never heard of. The parents of American-born Mamie Tape successfully challenged a principal’s refusal to enroll their daughter and other children of Chinese heritage into the Spring Valley Primary School in San Francisco, California, seven decades before the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education.

An Old Book, a Former Student, and Research Strategies

The following post, written by Peter DeCraene, the 2020-21 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow at the Library of Congress, was originally posted to the Teaching with the Library of Congress Blog. Books often surprise me – plot twists, different historical perspectives, or deeply drawn characters – but recently, I found a different kind of surprise […]

Sojourner Truth’s Most Famous Speech

The following is a guest post by Arlene Balkansky. Arlene recently retired from being a librarian in the Newspaper and Current Periodical Reading Room, and was a regular writer for Headlines and Heroes. On May 29, 1851 at the Woman’s Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio, abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth delivered what would […]

Women Who Dressed as Men and Made History

Pharaoh, pirate, soldier, spy. Most have heard of Joan of Arc, but throughout history and across cultures, there have been a great number of women who have dressed in male attire in order to fulfill the roles that had traditionally been reserved for men. Many disguised their identities, sometimes taking their secret to the grave, while others were brazen, and even celebrated by their contemporaries. While their stories have largely been lost to time, there are some that made their mark on history.

From State Hospitals to Pet Cemeteries to Feminist Communes, Chronicling America Restores Lost History.

Julianne Mangin is an independent researcher, writer, family historian, and blogger. She is a retired librarian who worked as a website developer at the Library of Congress from 1998 to 2011. This post highlights the ways Julianne has used online resources like Chronicling America* for her research. Amber Paranick (AP): How did you first learn […]

New to Chronicling America: The St. Croix Avis, US Virgin Islands (1865-1882)!

This month Chronicling America added newspapers from its 50th contributor – the University of the Virgin Islands!  This first newspaper from the U.S. Virgin Islands, the St. Croix Avis, provides a deep dive into a particularly tumultuous time in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  In 1867, the islands were on the cusp of being sold to the United States when a hurricane, earthquake, and tsunami struck within a month.  Covering the events of 1867 was the St. Croix Avis.