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Stephanie Wood Joins Kluge Center as Jay I. Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is pleased to announce the appointment of Stephanie Wood as Jay I. Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas. Wood will begin her time at the Kluge Center this October.

Wood is the Director and Research Associate at the Wired Humanities Projects at the University of Oregon. Prior to this position, Wood was adjunct faculty in Latin American History at the University of Oregon. From 1984 until 1989, Wood was the Assistant Professor in Latin American History and U.S. History at the University of Maine.

Wood is the author of one monograph, dozens of articles, and co-editor of five anthologies. Her monograph is titled “Transcending Conquest: Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico” (University of Oklahoma Press, 2003). She was the Principal Investigator of the NEH-funded Mapas Project (2006–2008), an online collection of indigenous-authored pictorial manuscripts from New Spain, and the online Nahuatl Dictionary (NEH-NSF, 2008–2012). She is currently expanding the Early Nahuatl Library of alphabetic manuscripts. She has directed five NEH-funded Summer Institutes for U.S. school teachers, titled “Mesoamerican Cultures and their Histories,” one held in Oregon and four in Mexico (the latest in 2015).

Wood holds a B.A. from University of California, Santa Cruz and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Sophia Rosenfeld Joins Kluge Center as Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is pleased to announce the appointment of Sophia Rosenfeld as Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North. Rosenfeld began her time at the Kluge Center this September. Rosenfeld is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches […]

How the Lowly Answering Machine Contributed to our Anxiety-Ridden Culture of Continuous Communication

Josh Lauer is a 2019 Digital Studies Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center as well as Associate Professor of Communication at the University of New Hampshire. His research interests include the history of communication technologies as well as consumer credit reporting, the topic of his 2017 book “Creditworthy: A History of Consumer Surveillance and […]

The Study of Mystical Traditions is Opening a Path Toward New Forms of Religious Thought and Practice

This is a guest post by Carrie Rosefsky Wickham. Wickham is the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South at the Library of Congress and Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Emory University. Can one be both a religious person and a humanist? If so, what kind of worldview might this entail? Together […]

Equitable Infrastructure, Democracy, and Why Private Industry Can’t Address the Digital Divide

Now, more than ever, vast amounts of digital information are instantly available to the public. And yet, accessing digital information and online services remains a challenge for those in areas without high-speed internet access. In this interview, Ann Eisenberg, Associate Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina and current Kluge Fellow, explained the […]

How Liberal Protestants Shaped America, Part 2

This is part two of our interview with Gene Zubovich. For the first part, click here. What drew the attention of activist Protestants towards international affairs, and what impact did that have? In Before the Religious Right I discuss the work liberal Protestants were doing to fight racism, economic inequality, and to reshape American foreign […]

How Liberal Protestant Activists Shaped America

Gene Zubovich is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, as well as a Kluge Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. He is the author of “Before the Religious Right.”  On April 19, 2022 at 4pm, Zubovich will discuss “Before the Religious […]

Navigating Liberty’s Promise: Black Women in Washington, DC and the End of Slavery

Nineteenth-century Washington, DC was home to thousands of enslaved people, as well as a hotbed of abolitionist activism. Black women were subject to incredible levels of legal and social restriction, but found ways to make their own lives within that world. Historian Tamika Nunley’s latest book, At the Threshold of Liberty: Women, Slavery, and Shifting […]