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Ivan Krastev Wins Two Prestigious Prizes

The John W. Kluge Center congratulates recent Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations Ivan Krastev on winning the prestigious 30th Annual Lionel Gelber Prize for his book The Light That Failed: Why the West Is Losing the Fight for Democracy, co-authored with Stephen Holmes. The Gelber Prize is awarded for the year’s best book on foreign affairs. Krastev wrote the award-winning book while in residence at the Kluge Center.

Earlier this year Krastev also won the Jean Améry Prize for European Essay Writing.

Krastev was recently interviewed for the Kluge Center blog about the themes of The Light That Failed, sharing his thoughts on Eastern Europe and Russia in the post-Cold War period.

Krastev is chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. A widely regarded expert on Balkan and European affairs, he sits on the board of trustees of the European Council on Foreign Relations and the Erste Foundation, as well as the advisory councils of the Open Society Foundations, the Center for European Policy Analysis and the European Cultural Foundation. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of The International Crisis Group. Krastev’s work appears frequently in The New York Times.

Please join us in congratulating Ivan Krastev on these great achievements.

The Entanglement of Power, Security, and Energy Supply – Part Two

I talked with Kluge Fellow Gaetano Di Tommaso about his research project, “Petro-Modernity and Statecraft: The U.S. Energy-National Security Nexus Reconsidered (1890s-1920s).” Before coming to the Kluge Center, Tano, as we call him here, was a Teaching Fellow at Sciences Po-Paris (Reims campus), in France. This is part two of the two-part interview. Click here for part one. […]

The Entanglement of Power, Security, and Energy Supply

I talked with Kluge Fellow Gaetano Di Tommaso about his research project, “Petro-Modernity and Statecraft: The U.S. Energy-National Security Nexus Reconsidered (1890s-1920s).” Before coming to the Kluge Center, Tano, as we call him here, was a Teaching Fellow at Sciences Po-Paris (Reims campus), in France. Giselle: How did you become interested in U.S. history and […]

The Assyrians, Between the State and the Opposition

Alda Benjamen is a Kluge Fellow, and was most recently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. She studies the Modern Middle East and Iraqi history, focusing on minoritization and pluralism in bilingual communities, as well as identity, memory and cultural heritage, and women and gender issues. Her current project is titled Negotiating […]

Watch: Chair in US-Russia Relations Breaks Down Whether Sanctions on Russia are Working

In February, the John W. Kluge Center brought together experts on US-Russia relations to discuss the efficacy of the ongoing sanctions on Russia. Jim Goldgeier, the most recent Library of Congress Chair in US-Russia Relations, started off the talk by explaining the significance of the topic. “Given the role of Congress in this, and given […]

Anxiety and Ambivalence in the Asia-Pacific region: The Dark Shadow of U.S.-China Strategic Competition

The following is a guest post by Minxin Pei, Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-China relations. Pei is the Tom and Margot Pritzker ’72 professor of government and the director of the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at Claremont McKenna College. He is also a non-resident senior fellow with the Asia program at […]

Kluge Center Event Marks the Centennial of the Paris Peace Conference

On Wednesday, January 16, the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress will host “The United States and the World: Legacies of the Paris Peace Conference”. This event marks the 100th anniversary of the Paris Peace Conference, which ended World War I and previewed many of the issues that would define international affairs […]

Cuba After Castro: A Conversation with Lanie Millar

Lanie Millar is an assistant professor in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon. While at the Library of Congress on a Kluge Fellowship, she is doing research for her book manuscript on post-revolutionary literature from Cuba and Angola. Her project is titled, “Cuba and Angola: Cultural Conversations Before and After the Cold […]