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Kluge Center Welcomes Dana R. Fisher into Residence

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is pleased to announce the appointment of Dana R. Fisher as Distinguished Visiting Scholar. Fisher will begin her time in residence in May, 2022. At the Kluge Center, she will work on the book project “Saving Ourselves: From Climate Shocks to Climate Action,” set to be published by Columbia University Press. Fisher plans to make use of the Library’s collections that relate to the history of the Civilian Conservation Corps in researching and writing the book.

Fisher is a Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Maryland and the President-Elect of the Eastern Sociological Society. Her research focuses on questions related to democracy, civic engagement, activism, and climate politics — most recently studying political elites’ responses to climate change, the emergent US Civilian Climate Corps, and activism around climate, systemic racism, and the American Resistance.

Professor Fisher has authored more than seventy research papers and book chapters and has written six books. She served as a Contributing Author for Working Group 3 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Sixth Assessment Review (IPCC AR6) writing about citizen engagement and civic activism.  In 2021-22, she is a Nonresident Senior Fellow with the Governance Studies program at The Brookings Institution.  Her media appearances include CNN, MSNBC, PBS NewsHour, and various programs on NPR. Her words have appeared in the popular media, including in the Washington Post, Slate, TIME Magazine, Politico, Business Insider and the American Prospect.  Fisher holds a Ph.D. and Master of Science degree from the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her undergraduate degree is in East Asian Studies and Environmental Studies from Princeton University.

Announcing the 2020 Jon B. Lovelace Fellow

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce that Camille Moreddu has been selected as the newest Jon B. Lovelace Fellow for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection at the Library of Congress. Camille Moreddu is a French cultural historian from Paris-Nanterre University. She has researched the emergence of the concept of “American […]

The Pillars of Democracy

The major institutions in American society are in a moment of crisis. From the branches of government to religious and civic organizations, the media, and political parties, these key foundations of American life are less respected, less trusted, and less involved in forming the character of individuals than at any point in our history. The […]

Rishad Choudhury on Studying the Breakdown of Muslim Empires Through the Hajj

Rishad Choudhury is a Kluge Fellow as well as Assistant Professor of History at Oberlin College. He is currently working on a book-length project, ‘‘Hajj between Empires: Indo-Muslim Pilgrimage and Political Culture, 1739–1820.’’ Mike Stratmoen: Could you describe your project for us? Rishad Choudhury: My book on the hajj pilgrimage is set in an age […]

Patrick Andelic Answers Six Questions About His Scholarship and Experience as a Residential Scholar at the Kluge Center.

Patrick Andelic is a lecturer in American History in the Humanities Department at Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, as well as a 2020 Kluge Fellow, slated to begin his residency at the John W. Kluge Center in May of 2021. He was also an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Fellow at the Kluge Center […]