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GIS Day on November 18th: Mapping the Pandemic

You are invited to join the Library of Congress in celebrating GIS Day on Wednesday, November 18th from 1-4pm EST, with an afternoon of engaging talks and discussions on the theme of “Mapping the Pandemic Cases, Traces, and Mutations.”

This presentation will premiere with closed captions on both the Library’s YouTube site and on the Library of Congress website. The presentation will also be available for viewing afterwards at those sites.

For almost everyone in the world, the last few months have been unlike any experienced in their lifetimes. The current public health crisis, spawned by the outbreak of COVID-19, has shown that viral pathogens pose an ever-present danger to global human health and economic stability. For cartographers and epidemiologists tracking the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, trying to understand its evolution, zoonotic spillover and mutations, as well as managing the distribution of billions of doses of a potential vaccine and PPE, the virus has presented a geospatial analysis challenge like none other. Speakers for GIS DAY 2020 will look closely at how mapping and GIS technologies have been used to help public health officials, emergency rooms, epidemiologists and the general public  as they all struggle to understand the spread of the disease and to allocate precious resources.

EVENT SCHEDULE

Keynote:
Dr. Este Geraghty, Chief Medical Officer at ESRI
The Role of GIS in Fighting the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic

Technical Papers:

Ensheng Dong, Center for System Science & Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Historic First: Mapping the Pandemic in Real Time

Mike Schoelen, ESRI Health and Human Services
Driven by GIS: A Resilient Supply Chain for COVID-19

John Hessler, Library of Congress & Johns Hopkins University
More Than Just Cases: Mapping the Mutations of SARS-CoV-2

 

We hope to see you there!

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