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Category: diversity

A small person looks at a large book with images representing Black history.

Celebrating African Americans and the Arts: The Color Purple

Posted by: Alison Hall

This year’s Black History Month theme of Celebrating African Americans and the Arts recognizes the impact of Black artists and their creations as well as the significant role of copyright in creative industries. As part of this year’s celebration, we reflect on the legacy of Alice Walker and her book The Color Purple.

Image styled like a section of microfilm, showing silhouettes of four young individuals standing in the streets of a deserted town.

Native American Heritage Month Highlight: Reservation Dogs

Posted by: Nicole Lamberson

During Native American Heritage Month, we celebrate the richness of Native American culture and its diverse array of creative expression. The U.S. Copyright Office’s records contain thousands of submissions from Native American creators in various artistic forms, including film, television, music, literature, and documents. Here we highlight the television series Reservation Dogs.

Meet Olivia Charmaine Morris: A Champion for “People of Color and Colorful People”

Posted by: Ashley Tucker

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ+) Pride Month, when we recognize the history and impact of LGBTQ individuals in the United States. This year, the Copyright Office celebrates Pride Month and extends our World Intellectual Property Day campaign by spotlighting Olivia Charmaine Morris (she/her), who is a queer media mogul and entrepreneur …

muliticolor representation of Dolly Parton (left) and Whitney Houston (right)

Celebrating Women Through Their Copyright Story: Dolly Parton and Whitney Houston

Posted by: Alison Hall

More than once, a cover of a hit song has become an even bigger hit than the original. According to American Songwriter, it happened with songs such as “Respect” (written and originally recorded by Otis Redding, remake by Aretha Franklin), “All Along the Watchtower” (written and originally recorded by Bob Dylan, remake by Jimi Hendrix), …

First Novel by a Native American Writer to Win a Pulitzer Prize House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday

Celebrating the Firsts: First Novel by a Native American Writer to Win a Pulitzer Prize

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This Native American Heritage Month, we are celebrating the "firsts" in a blog series called, "Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists." This blog features the first novel by a Native American writer to win the Pulitzer Prize. The novel is called House Made of Dawn and was written by N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa).

First comic to feature a team of Native American superheroes: Tribal Force by Jon Proudstar and Ryan Huna Smith

Celebrating the Firsts: First Comic to Feature a Team of Native American Superheroes

Posted by: Ashley Tucker

This year, we are celebrating Native American Heritage Month and Native American Heritage Day with a blog series called Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists. This blog post is the third in the series and focuses on Tribal Force, a comic book by writer Jon Proudstar (Yaqui/Mayan) and artist Ryan Huna Smith (Chemehuevi/Navajo). Published in 1996, this work moved the needle forward as America’s first comic to feature a team of Native American superheroes.

First painting by a Native American Artist Acquired by the National Gallery of Art: I See Red: Target by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

Celebrating the Firsts: First Painting by a Native American Artist Acquired by the National Gallery of Art

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This Native American Heritage Month, we are celebrating the "firsts" in a blog series called, "Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists." This blog features the first painting by a Native American artist acquired by the National Gallery of Art. The painting is called I See Red: Target and is by Juane Quick-to-See Smith (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation).

Pride in Literature: Inspiring Authors for Everyone

Posted by: Holland Gormley

Co-authored by Meg Efthimiadis, Assistant to the General Counsel, and Holland Gormley, Public Affairs Specialist The following blog is a part of the Copyright Office’s Copyright for All initiative, which aims to make the copyright system as understandable and accessible to as many members of the public as possible, including individuals and small entities as …