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Category: Native Americans

Image styled like a section of microfilm, showing silhouettes of four young individuals standing in the streets of a deserted town.

Native American Heritage Month Highlight: Reservation Dogs

Posted by: Nicole Lamberson

During Native American Heritage Month, we celebrate the richness of Native American culture and its diverse array of creative expression. The U.S. Copyright Office’s records contain thousands of submissions from Native American creators in various artistic forms, including film, television, music, literature, and documents. Here we highlight the television series Reservation Dogs.

First Novel by a Native American Writer to Win a Pulitzer Prize House Made of Dawn by N. Scott Momaday

Celebrating the Firsts: First Novel by a Native American Writer to Win a Pulitzer Prize

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This Native American Heritage Month, we are celebrating the "firsts" in a blog series called, "Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists." This blog features the first novel by a Native American writer to win the Pulitzer Prize. The novel is called House Made of Dawn and was written by N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa).

First comic to feature a team of Native American superheroes: Tribal Force by Jon Proudstar and Ryan Huna Smith

Celebrating the Firsts: First Comic to Feature a Team of Native American Superheroes

Posted by: Ashley Tucker

This year, we are celebrating Native American Heritage Month and Native American Heritage Day with a blog series called Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists. This blog post is the third in the series and focuses on Tribal Force, a comic book by writer Jon Proudstar (Yaqui/Mayan) and artist Ryan Huna Smith (Chemehuevi/Navajo). Published in 1996, this work moved the needle forward as America’s first comic to feature a team of Native American superheroes.

First painting by a Native American Artist Acquired by the National Gallery of Art: I See Red: Target by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

Celebrating the Firsts: First Painting by a Native American Artist Acquired by the National Gallery of Art

Posted by: Nora Scheland

This Native American Heritage Month, we are celebrating the "firsts" in a blog series called, "Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists." This blog features the first painting by a Native American artist acquired by the National Gallery of Art. The painting is called I See Red: Target and is by Juane Quick-to-See Smith (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation).

In top right corner, an open ink bottle is next to a fountain pen. Some drips of ink surround the tip. YText reads, "First Published Novel by a Native American Woman: Wynema: A Child of the Forest by S. Alice Callahan"

Celebrating the Firsts: First Published Novel by a Native American Woman

Posted by: Ashley Tucker

This year, we are celebrating Native American Heritage Month and Native American Heritage Day with a blog series called Celebrating the Firsts: Shining a Light on Trailblazing Artwork by Native Artists. In this four-part series, we are recognizing five indigenous creators who have participated in our copyright system and enriched our culture. Join us on a …