Inauguration Day: George Washington’s 1789 Oath of Office

Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress, uses George Washington’s 1789 copy of “Acts Passed at the First Congress of the United States of America,” which includes the U.S. Constitution, to tell a short story on how the presidential oath of office has been unchanged since the founding of the nation. It’s the same oath that Joe Biden will swear to today, 232 years later.

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Remembering I. M. Pei

I.M. Pei died Thursday at his home in Manhattan. He was 102. In recognition of his extraordinary achievements, we reprint this guest post by Mari Nakahara, curator of architecture, design and engineering in the Prints and Photographs Division, focusing on his items in the Library. It ran on his 100th birthday. Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming […]

Branch Rickey Crowdsourcing Project: It’s Outta Here!

This is a guest post from Lauren Algee, LC Labs Senior Innovation Specialist.  Just four months after the Library partnered with the public to transcribe the papers of baseball icon Branch Rickey, volunteers have transcribed all 1,926 pages of Rickey’s scouting reports, making them available for digital research just in time for Major League Baseball’s […]

Long-lost Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Stieglitz Letters Now at the Library

A never-seen-before collection of letters from Georgia O’Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz offers new insight into the couple’s art, marriage and ambitions during an eighteen-year span in which they were primary shapers of American Modernism. The letters were sent, independently of one another, to their mutual friend, filmmaker Henwar Rodakiewicz, with whom O’Keeffe seemed especially close. The Library acquired them from a private collection. This is the first time they have been available to the public.

Inquiring Minds: Teaching American Culture Through Movies

For the past three decades or so, Thomas Doherty has taught and written about films, television and Hollywood — a lot. An American studies professor at Brandeis University with a special interest in classical Hollywood, he has written seven books touching on topics including teen movies, censorship, Hitler and McCarthyism. His latest book, “Show Trial: […]