2017 Main Stage Authors Announced!

(The following is a repost from the National Book Festival blog. The author is Lola Pyne of the Library’s Office of Communications.)

Earlier this week, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden made an exciting video announcement detailing the stellar authors who will headline this year’s Library of Congress National Book Festival. She was joined in front of a live audience by The Washington Post’s book editor, Ron Charles, to reveal and discuss the Main Stage authors, their current books and what we can expect to hear from them when the 17th annual book festival rolls around on Sept. 2, 2017.

So without further ado, click play on the video below to relive the announcement. It features other exciting details about the 2017 National Book Festival, including the fact that the entire Main Stage program will be shown live on Facebook the day of the event! (Spoiler alert, you can also scroll down for the list of Main Stage authors.)


2017 Main Stage Lineup

  • David McCullough
  • Diana Gabaldon
  • J.D. Vance
  • Thomas L. Friedman
  • Condoleezza Rice
  • David Baldacci

Check out the video announcement to learn more about each of these authors and show up to the festival to see them present live on the Main Stage!

The 2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 2. The festival is made possible by the generosity of sponsors. You, too, can support the festival by making a gift now.

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