Join Us for a Serendipity Run – No Sneakers Required

And now for something completely different. On November 8, Jer Thorp, the Library of Congress Innovator-in-Residence, will take over the @LibraryCongress Twitter account to host a #SerendipityRun.

What’s a #SerendipityRun? Let’s ask Jer:

#SerendipityRun is an experiment in collaborative serendipity. During the run, we’ll see how far and wide we can range across the Library’s vast collections, riding waves of whimsy, curiosity and chance. On November 8, join an all-star cast of artists, writers, curators and Library staff as we explore the endless sea of possibility that can be found in the Library!

It can be challenging to find what you’re looking for in the Library’s enormous collections. We are always working on new ways to help you get the content you want. The #SerendipityRun is an opportunity to discover what you didn’t know you wanted and what you happen upon by chance. We’re excited to go where this experiment takes us, to see what you find and to hear your stories.

What: #SerendipityRun on Twitter

When: Thursday, November 8, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET

Where: We’ll kick it off from the @LibraryCongress Twitter account. Follow the activity using the #SerendipityRun hashtag.

Why: Take a serendipity-powered tour through the Library of Congress collections. Connect with others and share stories through primary sources.

Who: You! We will have special guests joining us throughout the three-hour run and we want you to participate, too.

How: During the run, if someone tweets an item from the Library’s collections that connects with you, look at the item on loc.gov. What did the item make you think of? Does it remind you of something or make you curious to find other content? If you find a new item that interests you, tweet that item using the #SerendipityRun hashtag and share your story. Be sure to add the loc.gov link and attach an image, so others can use it as a jumping-off point for their discovery.

Join us Thursday on Twitter!

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