Literacy: You’ve Got Ten Days Left!

(The following is a guest post by Guy Lamolinara, communications officer in the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress.)

There is still time to get your application in for a Library of Congress Literacy Award. The deadline is midnight EDT on March 31.

Literacy Awards benefactor David Rubenstein interviews 2016 award winners Allister Chang of Libraries Without Borders, Sarah Walzer of the Parent-Child Home Program and Noel Gunther of WETA Reading Rockets on October 27, 2016. Photo by Shawn Miller.

Literacy Awards benefactor David Rubenstein interviews 2016 award winners Allister Chang of Libraries Without Borders, Sarah Walzer of the Parent-Child Home Program and Noel Gunther of WETA Reading Rockets on October 27, 2016. Photo by Shawn Miller.

By spending just a few hours to fill out the application (and obtain the necessary letters of recommendation), the payoff can be great: an award of either $150,000 or $50,000 or recognition by the Library of Congress as a “best practices” practitioner.

If you are an organization doing great things in reading and literacy promotion, or know of an organization worthy of recognition, please send us an application. Our Literacy Awards advisory board will carefully review and consider your application.

So far, the Literacy Awards program has given more than $1 million to extraordinary literacy organizations in the United States and around the world. With the help of these awards, organizations large and small are making an important difference in increasing global literacy rates.

You can learn more about the work of past winners by reviewing our best practices publications for the past four years. You will also see a list of award winners for 2013 through 2016. The application, an FAQ and other relevant details are available here.

The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress administers these awards, which were created and are supported by philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, who also supports many other Library initiatives, including its annual National Book Festival, now in its 17th year, to take place this Sept. 2.

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