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The 2017 Kellogg Lecture featured Professor Jeremy Waldron’s Discussion of the Fundamentals of Immigration Law

On November 1st, the Law Library hosted the latest Kellogg Biennial Lecture. This endowed series of lectures on jurisprudence is made possible through the generosity of Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg.

This year’s Kellogg Biennial Lecture was delivered by New York University School of Law Professor Jeremy Waldron, whose lecture was titled, “The Philosophical Foundations of Immigration Law.” Mr. Kellogg first provided an introduction, explaining that this series of lectures provides a space to engage in discussions about the theoretical aspects of law. Mr. Kellogg cited the influence of H.L.A Hart and Learned Hand as evidence that jurisprudence is not only an academic concern, it has an impact on the practice of law.  Professor Waldron opened the body of his lecture by acknowledging that immigration is a fiercely debated political topic in the United States and Europe.  He then posed a series of questions that provided the audience with the opportunity to examine the fundamental assumptions underpinning our immigration law system. One exercise, which was inspired by John Locke, examined immigration law from the perspective of humans living in a state of nature.

You can watch the full lecture at the video below. We would welcome your feedback in the comments.

Professor of Law Jeremy Waldron to Deliver the 2017 Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence

The Law Library of Congress is pleased to announce that legal and political philosophy professor Jeremy Waldron of New York University School of Law, will deliver the 2017 Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture on Jurisprudence. The lecture, “The Philosophical Foundations of Immigration Law,” is scheduled for 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 1. […]

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