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Acta de Independencia de Centro América — Pic of the Week

This is a guest post by Hazel Ceron, external relations assistant with the Law Library Office of External Relations.

On this day 196 years ago (September 15, 1821), the Acta de Independencia de Centro América proclaimed independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from Spain. In celebration of the 196th anniversary, today’s post features a short list of historical sites in Guatemala, the country where this act was signed.

The Acta de Independencia de Centro América was signed at the Palacio Nacional de Guatemala in the capital, Guatemala City, by José Cecilio del Valle. The site is now recognized as the Plaza de la Constitución, photographed below.

[Guatemala, Plaza de Armas] ca between 1915 and 1920. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.25869

[Guatemala, Plaza de Armas] ca between 1915 and 1920. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.25869

Prior to Guatemala City, Antigua Guatemala (translated as Old Guatemala) was the country’s capital. Antigua Guatemala suffered many damages from earthquakes that ultimately caused the capital to relocate. The photo illustrates Antigua Guatemala anywhere from 1899 to 1926, almost two centuries after the 1717 earthquake.

[Plaza and volcano of Antigua Guatemala]. ca between 1899 and 1926. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.50065

[Plaza and volcano of Antigua Guatemala]. ca between 1899 and 1926. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.50065

The city has been protected over the last few years by the adoption of Article 61 – Guatemala’s 1985 (latest) Constitution. In accordance with Article 61, the city of Antigua Guatemala must be recognized as a national monument. The city is still being preserved today, as I learned when I recently traveled to explore one of Antigua’s most visited attractions: Palace of the Captains General.

Palace of the Captains General during sunset. Photo by Hazel Ceron

Palace of the Captains General during sunset. Photo by Hazel Ceron

Pioneering Women in Congress

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage […]

“Would You Be Interested in Getting (Attorney General) William Wirt’s Head Back?” Rebecca Roberts Brings Us a Tale From the Congressional Cemetery

This is a guest post by Rebecca Boggs Roberts. Rebecca is a program coordinator at Smithsonian Associates, writer, and the former program director for the Historic Congressional Cemetery. In 2003, an unidentified man called the Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and asked the cemetery manager, “Would you be interested in getting William Wirt’s head back?” The answer, of course, […]

Bringing Congress to the Classroom with a new Educational Resources Page

This is a guest post by Laura Read Lee, a Junior Fellow in the Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress. In this post, Laura describes the new page that she designed, “Bringing Congress to the Classroom.” The Digital Resources Division of the Law Library of Congress has recently launched a new webpage […]

A Guide to Researching EU Law

The following is a guest post by Micaela DelMonte, a lawyer from the European Parliamentary Research Service who volunteered at the Law Library of Congress during May 2017. News about Brexit and the so-called Article 50 procedure have dominated the news about the European Union (EU) lately. If you are interested in researching these or […]

Proxy Voting in France

The following is a guest post from Nicolas Boring, foreign law specialist covering French speaking jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. France has just finished its election season!  French citizens elected Emmanuel Macron as their new president earlier in May, and they returned to the voting booths on June 11 and June 18 for parliamentary […]

The Law and Punctuation

This is a guest post by Janeen Williams, legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress. Grammar enthusiasts have long debated the utility of the Oxford comma. In the past, authors have been advised that usage of Oxford commas (also known as serial commas) is an issue of style and will be determined by […]

Danish Law – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, a foreign law research consultant covering Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. This post is part of a series highlighting the Law Library’s foreign law collections. A couple weeks ago, Jenny wrote about Germany’s “Day of the Basic Law,” which is celebrated on the anniversary […]