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Pic of the Week – Sports, Law, and Tradition in Hats

The following is a guest post by Peter Roudik, Director of Legal Research at the Law Library of Congress. Peter has previously written for In Custodia Legis on a number of topics related to Russia and the former Soviet Union. These include posts on Assassinations of Russian Ambassadors, A Spring Holiday for Workers, the Soviet Investigation of Nazi War Crimes, Lustration in Ukraine, Crimean History, Status and Referendum, Regulating the Winter Olympics in Russia, Soviet Law and the Assassination of JFK, and the Treaty on the Creation of the Soviet Union.

Last week, many of us were watching the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in South Korea and admired the diversity of costumes and uniforms the teams were wearing at the Parade of Nations and athletic events. Some of them were designed by the athletes themselves, others were created by famous dress makers, and some teams uniforms were proposed by the International Olympic Committee.  However, there was one team whose members were wearing clothes that soon might be mandated by the law of their home country. This is the team from Kyrgyzstan, which consists of two athletes competing in two skiing events, slalom and cross country.

Two men from Kyrgyzstan sitting with wooden dishes

Trades of the Kyrgyz. Manufacture of wooden dishes Turkestanskii al’bom, chast’ promyslovai︠a︡, 1871-1872, part 3, p. 44. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, //lccn.loc.gov/2007681439.

Last month, a bill was introduced in the Kyrgyz legislature, under which a white felt hat called Ak Kalpak —a centuries-old traditional head gear of older Kyrgyz men—will be recognized as a national symbol of the country together with the flag, anthem, and the coat of arms.  Similar laws establishing a national cap can be found in Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei. The bill provides for this hat to become a mandatory part of attire for all Kyrgyz government officials, including the President, during official foreign visits in order to “promote and preserve Kyrgyz traditions and culture.” A special provision of the bill applies to athletes participating in sport competitions abroad. To be in compliance with the law, athletes must carry the Ak Kalpak at official ceremonies. Soon we might see this cap as a regular element of official Kyrgyz sport uniforms!

60 Years of Lego Building Blocks and Danish Patent Law

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, who covers Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Elin’s previous posts include Finland: 100 Years of Independence – Global Legal Collection Highlights, Alfred Nobel’s Will: A Legal Document that Might Have Changed the World and a Man’s Legacy, Swedish Detention Order Regarding Julian Assange, The Masquerade King and […]

Finland: 100 Years of Independence – Global Legal Collection Highlights

The following is a guest post by Elin Hofverberg, who covers Scandinavian jurisdictions at the Law Library of Congress. Elin’s previous posts include Alfred Nobel’s Will: A Legal Document that Might Have Changed the World and a Man’s Legacy, Swedish Detention Order Regarding Julian Assange, The Masquerade King and the Regulation of Dancing in Sweden, The Trade Embargo Behind the […]

Two Koreas Separated by Demilitarized Zone

This following is a guest post by Sayuri Umeda, a foreign law specialist who covers Japan and various other countries in East and Southeast Asia. She has previously written posts for In Custodia Legis on various topics, including English translations of post-World War II South Korean laws, laws and regulations passed in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake, and […]

Canadian Courts Are Taking a Step Toward Corporate Liability of Multinationals for Wrongdoings Abroad

The following is a guest post by Marie-Philippe Lavoie, an intern who worked with Tariq Ahmad in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress this summer. The globalization of business has allowed multinational corporations to conduct economic activities that transcend national boundaries. These activities have had both a positive and a negative impact […]

Communicating with the Dead: Can the Unknown be Regulated?

The following is a guest post by Clare Feikert-Ahalt, a foreign law specialist at the Law Library of Congress covering the United Kingdom and several other jurisdictions. Clare has written a number of posts for In Custodia Legis, including two other Halloween-related posts titled “The Case of a Ghost Haunted England for Over Two Hundred […]

Acta de Independencia de Centro América — Pic of the Week

This is a guest post by Hazel Ceron, external relations assistant with the Law Library Office of External Relations. On this day 196 years ago (September 15, 1821), the Acta de Independencia de Centro América proclaimed independence for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from Spain. In celebration of the 196th anniversary, today’s […]

Pioneering Women in Congress

The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage […]

“Would You Be Interested in Getting (Attorney General) William Wirt’s Head Back?” Rebecca Roberts Brings Us a Tale From the Congressional Cemetery

This is a guest post by Rebecca Boggs Roberts. Rebecca is a program coordinator at Smithsonian Associates, writer, and the former program director for the Historic Congressional Cemetery. In 2003, an unidentified man called the Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and asked the cemetery manager, “Would you be interested in getting William Wirt’s head back?” The answer, of course, […]