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An Interview with Julie Schwarz, Foreign Law Intern

Today’s interview is with Julie Schwarz, a foreign law intern working in the Global Legal Research Directorate of the Law Library of Congress under the supervision of Nicolas Boring, the foreign law specialist covering French-speaking jurisdictions.

Photograph of Julie Schwarz

Julie Schwarz, a foreign law intern at the Law Library of Congress. Photo courtesy of Julie Schwarz.

Describe your background.

I was born in Paris, France. When I was eight years old, we moved to New York City for four years. Living abroad was an amazing experience and contributed to my desire to learn more about the world and culture surrounding me.

What is your academic/professional history?

Throughout high school, I knew I wanted to pursue law, but I was disappointed by how national it seemed, as I yearned for more international experiences. I discovered the dual LL.B. and Master 1 degrees between King’s College London and Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne University, and immediately knew this was what I wanted to do. During these degrees, I discovered my passion for comparative law, private international law, and arbitration, which led me to the Master 2 degree in European and International Business Law at Paris Dauphine PSL University.

Following my Master 2 degree, I chose to pursue an LL.M. at Georgetown University, from which I graduated this summer. My LL.M. focused on international arbitration and dispute resolution, and I interned part-time in Paul Hastings’ arbitration department. At Georgetown, I was a board member of both the International Arbitration Society and the International Law Society.

How would you describe your job to other people?

I am interning in the Global Legal Research Directorate and assisting Nicolas Boring with requests on foreign law issues in French-speaking European and African jurisdictions. I conduct legal research and draft reports in response to requests the Library receives from numerous sources, including the U.S. Congress and federal agencies, as well as from the public. I also draft articles on recent legal developments in these jurisdictions for the Global Legal Monitor.

Why did you want to work at the Law Library of Congress?

I was fascinated with the idea that the Library of Congress not only had a legal department which answered questions for Congress, the government, and the public, but also this department answered questions of international law! Working at the Law Library of Congress thus seemed like an exciting opportunity to both continue improving my research and drafting skills and further my passion for comparative law! Working here for the past few weeks, I’ve really enjoyed researching the laws of French-speaking jurisdictions that I’m less familiar with and giving reports on French law to Congress.

What is the most interesting fact you have learned about the Law Library of Congress?

That the Library has items in many different formats! It doesn’t just house books and journals, but also items like drawings, photographs, films, and sound and video recordings.

What’s something most of your co-workers do not know about you?

I have been working as a sailing instructor since I was 16 and am currently in training to become a sailing judge!

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