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Shadow Science: Using Eclipses to Shed New Light on Heavenly Bodies, September 12 Lecture with NASA’s Chief Scientist, Dr. James L. Green

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference Librarian in the Science, Technology, and Business Division.

A total solar eclipse. Courtesy of NASA https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-recommends-safety-tips-to-view-the-august-solar-eclipse

People are still talking about the total solar eclipse of last August, and many of us are already excited about the next one on April 8, 2024.  That will be the only total solar eclipse in the 21st century where totality is visible in Mexico, the USA, and Canada!

For those who are in the DC area and would like to hear what scientists have learned from the recent solar eclipse and other eclipses, as well as what they can uncover from transits and occultations, you are in for a treat at the Library of Congress.  We are fortunate to have NASA’s new Chief Scientist, James L. Green, discuss how scientists continue to use shadows created by these phenomena to discover amazing things, such as new planets orbiting other stars (exoplanets) and new rings at Saturn.  Dr. Green will provide spectacular examples from recent events.

Jim Green was Director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA for twelve years until he was named chief scientist and assumed his new duties May 1.  During those years, he managed numerous successful missions that have ushered in a golden age of planetary exploration. These include the Juno Jupiter mission; the Dawn mission to Vesta and Ceres; the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter; Mars rovers Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity; and the New Horizons mission to Pluto and beyond.

Date:  Wednesday, September 12

Time:  11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Place:  Pickford Theater, 3rd floor, Madison Building

For inquiries about this program, contact Stephanie Marcus in the Science, Technology & Business Division at [email protected] or the division office at: (202) 707-1212. Individuals requiring accommodations for this event are requested to submit a request at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or [email protected].

Binge Watching Science Webcasts! Celebrating Twelve Years of the NASA Goddard Lecture Series at the Library of Congress

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference & Research Specialist, in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. She is also author of the blog posts “Kebabs, Kabobs, Shish Kebabs, Shashlyk, and: Chislic,” “The Potato Transformed,” and “Susan Fenimore Cooper: The First American Woman to Publish Nature Writing.” The Science, […]

Announcing “What’s New in Science, Technology, and Business”

The Science, Technology, & Business Division has long sent periodic email updates on “What’s New in Science and Technology”, covering lectures, exhibits, and other news. It has been newly re-named–“What’s New in Science, Technology, & Business”–and will feature updates and information from Business too! If you want to receive occasional emails about special events, lectures, current […]

Nobel Physicist Ernest O. Lawrence: A Small Town, Cyclotrons, and the Birth of Big Science

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference & Research Specialist, in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. She is also author of the blog posts “Kebabs, Kabobs, Shish Kebabs, Shashlyk, and: Chislic” and “The Potato Transformed.” I grew up in the small town of Canton, South Dakota.  A […]

How “Shop Class” Helped Win the War: The “Model Aircraft Project” of World War II

This post was written by Michelle Cadoree Bradley, a Science Reference Specialist in the Science, Technology and Business Division. In the collections of the Library of Congress, there are thousands of books in red buckram binding. These fairly innocuous exteriors can sometimes hide unique items. One such item from the stacks is the book Model Aircraft Project from […]

Engineers Encountering Engineers: Identifying Conference Papers

This post was written by John F. Buydos, Science Reference Section, Science, Technology and Business Division, Library of Congress Whether it is engineers collaborating with other engineers to remain up-to-date in their field or to discuss the competency of other practitioners, one of the major ways that collaboration is accomplished is by attending conferences and […]

How to Survive a Plague: October 23 Book Talk with David France

American investigative reporter, non-fiction author and filmmaker David France will discuss his book How to Survive a Plague: The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS, a definitive history of the successful battle to halt the AIDS epidemic.  Inspired by his Oscar-nominated documentary of the same name, How to Survive a Plague is […]

A Pioneering Science Educator

Today’s post was written by Denise Dempsey a Science Reference Librarian who has previously written about the women featured in the motion picture “Hidden Figures” and the post “A Family of Pharmacists”. Among the photographs in the Picture This blog post, Portraits of Nineteenth Century African American Women Activists Newly Available Online, is one of […]

Cassini’s Grand Finale: September 7 Lecture with NASA’s Dr. Conor Nixon

This post was authored by Stephanie Marcus, Science Reference Librarian in the Science, Technology, and Business Division. Now that we’ve had the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse, it’s time to move on to the next big event on NASA’s calendar, and that is the Grand Finale of the Cassini-Huygens Mission, a cooperative project of NASA, the […]