Visual and Virtual Opportunities – Photograph Analysis Webinars for Teachers

New York City book campaign. Photo by Abel & Company, 1919. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.40926 Photograph shows a woman standing on a pile of books speaking into a megaphone for an American Library Association War Service promotion to collect books for soldiers fighting in Europe.

New York City book campaign. Photo by Abel & Company, 1919. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.40926

Kristi Finefield of the Prints and Photographs Division wrote this post, which appeared in a more expanded form on the Picture This blog. Information on how to register for the webinars can be found on the Webinars and Workshops page of the Library’s Teachers site.

Through Picture This, staff of the Prints and Photographs Division connect virtually with readers every week with stories about our collections. In the course of this past year, we have tried out new ways to reach out virtually while we are unable to meet in person.

Our newest virtual offering takes its cue from a longtime series in Picture This called “Double Take.” In that series, we take a deep dive into an image, often spurred by an initial question. Along the way, we convey tips and techniques for uncovering unknown details, hidden stories and more. The idea behind “Double Take” is going live, as well as expanding to include additional staff and new content, thanks to a partnership with our Library colleagues in the Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office. The series kicks off next week, on Thursday, Jan. 28 at 4:00 pm ET.

Read on for several opportunities to interact with and learn from staff of the Prints and Photographs Division, including ongoing virtual orientations and this new series of webinars.

Double Take Series:

The “Double Take” series invites participants to join specialists from the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division, to explore and unravel some of the mystery of intriguing images from the collections. Along the way, the experts will share research strategies, visual literacy techniques, and answer questions.

January 28, 2021 – 4-5PM ET
“White House or Not?”
Kristi Finefield, Reference Specialist, Prints and Photographs Division

Join Reference Specialist Kristi Finefield to look closely at a photo from the Library’s collections, to apply visual literacy and photo research techniques, and finally to answer the question: is this the White House or not?

February 18, 2021 – 4-5PM ET
“Why Was This Picture Made?”
Sara Duke, Curator, Prints and Photographs Division

When examining pictures of the past, sometimes asking the question of “Why?” leads one down an unexpected path. In this session, Sara Duke, Curator of Popular & Applied Graphic Art, will invite participants on an exploration of an image from the Library’s collections, with that question in mind.

March 25, 2021 – 4-5PM ET
“When Was This Photograph Taken?”
Kristi Finefield, Reference Specialist, Prints and Photographs Division

What clues can you use to determine when a picture was made or a photo was taken? In this session, Reference Specialist Kristi Finefield walks attendees through the process of determining the date range of an aerial photograph of Washington, D.C.

April 29, 2021 – 4-5PM ET
“How Should We Index This Image?”
Arden Alexander, Cataloging Specialist, Prints and Photographs Division & Libby McKiernan, Processing Technician, Prints and Photographs Division

Join Cataloging Specialist Arden Alexander and Processing Technician Libby McKiernan on an exploration of the Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials (TGM), to learn approaches to describing images, using topical terms, plus ways you can use the TGM for your personal or work collections. The specialists will also invite participants to index some images from the Library’s collections with them.

Keep an eye on the Webinars and Workshops page for more details about the sessions and registration information.

Frost. Woodcut by Bertha Lum, copyrighted 1920. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.10484

Frost. Woodcut by Bertha Lum, copyrighted 1920. //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.10484

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