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American Folklife Center Fellowships and Awards 2019

2019 Proposals due March 12, 2019

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress offers three competitive awards in 2019 to support  scholars working with ethnographic collection materials at the Library of Congress and for fieldworkers on folklife and related topics. This year, the American Folklife Center’s Archie Green Fellowship, Parsons Fund Award, and Blanton Owen Fund Award share the same deadline: 12:00 midnight, Tuesday, March 12, 2019.

Following is more information about each award offered in 2019. Use this link for an overview of all Research Awards, Fellowships, and Funded Internships offered by the American Folklife Center, with instructions for applications and lists of past recipients.

A portrait of a man wearing a medal

The Archie Green Fellowships are named after folklorist Archie Green, shown here wearing his Library of Congress Living Legend Award. Photo by Derek Green, August, 2007.

  • Archie Green Fellowships of up to $35,000 each to support new, original, independent field research into the culture and traditions of contemporary American workers and/or occupational groups within the United States will be awarded in 2019. Historically three or four of these awards have been given each year. The Archie Green Fellowships are intended to support new research and generate significant digital archival collections which will be preserved in the American Folklife Center archive and made available to researchers and the public. For more information and application instructions see fund information available on the Research Awards page.

    Two men in a small boat, one is standing and pushing the boat with a pole

    Folklorist Gerald E. Parsons, Jr. (1940-1995) coordinated reference in the Library’s Folklife Reading Room. He was a fieldworker with many interests and he was especially enthusiastic about all things related to waterfowl hunting. In this photo he poles a New Jersey skiff on the Patuxent River near Upper Marboro, Maryland, while former Folklife Center staffer Carl Fleischhauer attempts to record the conversations of two hunters, who are railbirding nearby. Gerry established the The Gerald E. and Corinne L. Parsons Fund for Ethnography at the Library of Congress, named in honor of his parents. Photo by Paula Johnson, September 1984. (PFP84-BPJ-233888-2-25)

  • The Gerald E. and Corinne L. Parsons Fund Award  is offered to increase awareness of the ethnographic collections at the Library of Congress and to make the collections of primary ethnographic materials housed anywhere at the Library of Congress available for the needs and uses of those in the private sector. This year the award funds total $4000 and this amount is usually divided among more than one recipient. For more information and application instructions see fund information available on the Research Awards page.

    A man looks at photograph slides on a light table

    Folklorist Blanton Owen (1945-1998) edits and assigns numbers to his color slides prior to adding them to AFC’s Blue Ridge Parkway Folklife Project collection, 1977-1981 (AFC 1982/009). Photo by Margaret Counts, BR8-10-20228/26A.

  • The Blanton Owen Fund was established in 1999 in memory of folklorist Blanton Owen by his family and friends to support ethnographic field research and documentation in the United States, especially by young scholars and documentarians. Currently, this award is offered every other year. The total available amount is about $1000 and historically this has usually been split between more than one recipient. For more information and application instructions see fund information available on the Research Awards page.

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